Justice League: A Tea Party Movie Review

Justice League: A Tea Party Movie Review

The Worcester Tea Party Eagle Soars Move Review Justice LeagueJustice League is a wonderful Tea Party movie earning 4.5 / 5 on the Eagle Soars Meter of American Values.  The core theme of the movie illustrates effectively the horrors caused by those who wish to destroy individuality in the name of “unity.”

The maniacal villain Steppenwolf is bent on destroying the world due to his frustration with his inability to produce anything of value.  So he turns this frustration into aggression with the goal of enslaving mankind to serve his will.  This theme illustrates the evil of the ever-present groupthink of public sector unions and all other political entities that consider “solidarity” one of its highest values.

To do this, Steppenwolf wishes for the sum of all power.  As with all people with similar goals, analogous to the political power of today, this can only be achieved through the destruction of the individual, their egos, and their lives in order to bring about the solidarity and coercion necessary to amass a blind following.  Steppenwolf surrounded himself with an army of identical human shaped bug winged monsters born and fed by human fear and willing to do his bidding without any question.

The heroes are of course brilliantly played with obvious undertones of a capitalist morality.  With references to Ayn Rand’s concept of certain people being “. . . the engine of the world” and of course Batman’s admission that his superpower is his immense wealth, we see a clear celebration of success and productivity as well as the willingness of many to voluntarily give back to society.  In the case of Batman, he is driven to use his immense wealth to satisfy his love for justice.

A Profound Observation

The President of the Worcester Tea Party makes a profound observation regarding one of the subthemes of the movie.  Upon completing the viewing, Matt O’Brien stated “It is an interesting juxtaposition between Bruce Wayne, who suppresses his humanity in attempt to gain superpowers and Clark Kent, who suppresses his super powers to gain more humanity.”

This analysis shows brilliantly that even those whom we perceive possess everything, they too want more.  And for both, the ‘more’ that they want is a better world for everyone.

The Use of Fear to Destroy

There’s plenty of action, adventure, narrow escapes and, of course, in the end the bad guy loses, although how Steppenwolf loses is one of the most important underlying concepts that underscores the importance of a capitalist morality.

Steppenwolf fights the heroes in an epic battle, until his weapon is destroyed triggering his fear of failure, which attracts his minions who sense his weakness and strike.  This is reminiscent of what happens at the end of all socialist regimes that adore coercion (e.g. Yugoslavia).  This is not a cautionary tale for every erstwhile dictator (e.g. Mugabe in Zambia).  After Steppenwolf is defeated, the strange horror he had controlled and tried to use for destruction miraculously bursts forth in an array of strange and beautiful flowers as peace and prosperity return.

Statism vs. Individualism

In the philosophy of socialism, progressivism, and communism, morality is founded on the belief that people, at their core, are bad.  Therefore, people must be forced to do good deeds, or in the case of Justice League’s antagonist, evil deeds.  This concept is profound because capitalists understand and truly believe that most people are good.  People whom are unsure of the morality of capitalism find this concept hard to accept; but once they do the philosophy is easily understood and applied:

A society consisting of people who truly own their lives,
when left to act upon their own free will,
will choose to help others.

This is true justice, and the Justice League nails it!

 

Authored by John Niewicki